Jump to content

Recommended Posts

It doesn't appear from your quote that the author is confusing Soi Twilight with Patpong, as it does indeed run off Surawong, in the entertainment district known as Patpong.

Yes, I know where it is. However, Patpong is an area owned by the Patpong family. Plaza Thaniya or the Japanese Soi also runs off Suriwongse, Soi TanTawan runs off Suriwongse but who would ever say that Tawan Bar or the Japanese places are in Patpong. Is Moonlight in Patpong?  Sorry, I read his book years ago and it is a screed written by a man ran out of Thailand and Cambodia for his "adventures" 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I must say, I found works of Pira Sudham rather deathly boring.  He writes his stories with a particular social message he wants to convey in mind and he tends to bash you over the head with it. If you want to read some short stories set in the north-east Isaan  region, I would suggest the "Moonlight in the Morning"  by Andrea McNicoll. It is a set of interlinked short stories in a in village life in Isaan where the women are the main protagonists. 

Another good read is "Mindfulness and Murder", by Nick Wilgus, a murder mystery set in a Buddhist monastery.

I would also highly recommend "Very Thai" by Philip Cornwell Smith. It is great book to get you in the mood for Thailand before you go, especially if you have been before and will recognise so many of the things in it. It is like a little mini encyclopaedia of all things uniquely Thai,  he has a short chapter on each the little cultural quirks of Thailand, and it is brilliantly illustrated as well with photographs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone like those ever increasing " jail" books where a ex prisoner writes of their incareceration usualky describing some hellhole.

 

I did read The Damage done & not without my daughter but not my cup of tea

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would also highly recommend "Very Thai" by Philip Cornwell Smith. It is great book to get you in the mood for Thailand before you go, especially if you have been before and will recognise so many of the things in it. It is like a little mini encyclopaedia of all things uniquely Thai,  he has a short chapter on each the little cultural quirks of Thailand, and it is brilliantly illustrated as well with photographs.

 

Philip lives locally in Bangkok. Another book of interest more to those who have visited Bangkok and think they know it well is Bangkok Found by Alex Kerr. They will soon find they don't know it nearly as well as they thought! Kerr also lives locally and is an accomplished writer. His Lost Japan won that country's highest literary award. He remains the only foreigner ever to have won it. He wanders through many topics that give Thailand its unique 'Thainess'. He also has an interesting view on the sex scene in the city.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As I will step in the plane tomorrow just about some other subjects:

BKK-city:

bangkok inside out

A geek in Thailand, both likely out of print and much more uptodate and alternative as that rather meek Very Thai.

About Thai language:

entertaining and probably with lots of explanations you did not know about:

In the bedroom, out of trouble )yes, str8, but gives you loads of info too)

Heart Talk , about how the Thai see emotions and what words to use

 both also print long ago but last yr still to be found in some booksops in BKK

And for the lucky few who really know about speaking Thai etc/

Outrageous Thai, assumed to controversial to be printed in Th so that was done in SIN, Tuttle press-periplus. i bought mine in KUL.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/21/2018 at 11:56 AM, PeterRS said:

Someone mentioned Cocktail Boys about gogo bar life in Thailand. There is little in the story lines we have not read somewhere before. I found it quite boring and did not enjoy it.

I thought the same initially but was on a long boring plane ride and persisted, and it ended up hooking me in. Quite a few flaws but decent for a self published series, I ended up reading all three books. One anecdote however has been directly lifted from Private Dancer!

Thumbs up for Bangkok People by John Eckardt, a collection of character profiles originally written as magazine articles. 

Made a start on Jasmine Nights which I thought would be right up my street, but DNF though the author writes well.

Read The Quiet American a decade ago, time for a revisit.

Twilight Soi by William Stapleton was thoroughly rubbished on the Bangkokbois blog at the time of its release as a ridiculous and paranoid flight of fancy, riddled with errors. Will post link to review if I can find it again. 

Working my way through the other recommendations now. 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/25/2018 at 7:33 PM, paborn said:

Another good read is "Mindfulness and Murder", by Nick Wilgus, a murder mystery set in a Buddhist monastery.

 

Thanks, Forressteind

 

I just read book one and two and they are terrific reads.

Glad you liked it paborn, I believe a film was made from the story later, however I have never seen it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maverick Publishers has several books on Thailand, quick easy reads and good for the beach or plane.

I recommend The Last Executioner, a look at Bang Kwang prison in the 1980s. Lady Boys is an anthology of personal histories from real lady boys, pretty much what you’d expect, both gut wrenching and repetitive; however some might find the stories of Nong, who was a personality around Soi Twilight till her death, and Sarah, who ran the “HomyInn” a gay hotel in Pattaya leased from the owner of the Rose Hotel, interesting. Too many “farangs on a journey of self discovery” memoirs. 

https://www.maverickhouse.com/books/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have just finished an amazing first novel - The Final Retreat by Stephen Hough. It is a short book, less than 200 pages the size of a paperback. But it packs an almighty punch. To try and explain any detail of the story is to give away too much. So I will just say it is a series of entries into a notebook penned by a Catholic priest. No, this is not about pedophiles. But it is about being gay and being a priest. It is also very much a novel of opposites: loneliness and the desire for companionship, yearning and disgust, futility and the need for justification, age and youth, despair and the ache after even brief moments of ecstasy. The writing is quite superb. 

Hough is one of today's foremost classical concert pianists, a painter and goodness knows what else. The Economist magazine named him as one of 20 living polymaths - whatever that may mean! On the basis of The Final Retreat, he is destined to become an equally acclaimed writer. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...