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12is12

Medellin - accommodations with the Cedulla process?

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I stayed in Holiday Inn express and booked a double occupancy didn't have problems, except one guy I brought robbed me after blowing Devil's breath in my face.....long story....that was awhile ago, not sure if they still allow guests, especially after that, lol

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IMO you’re really overthinking this @12is12.
 

Just book double occupancy for your room in the hotel you prefer and ask Reception to check ID when you have a visitor. Don’t fret over the possible charge as it’s a VERY small price to pay for your security.
 

BTW when do you visit Colombia.?

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Thx, but:

It isnt the money; I have no prblm paying double. I have 2 concerns:

The small: some hotels don't accept revolving second occupant.

The big one: when I'll ask them to check ID, they'll know for sure it's sex industry.

I'll visit Medellin in August, for the flower festival. Will b happy to meet any forum member there (-:

 

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33 minutes ago, 12is12 said:

The big one: when I'll ask them to check ID, they'll know for sure it's sex industry.

Possibly. But not for certain. It’s normal practice in Latin America to check the ID of any unregistered person going to an hotel room. 
 

Just bear in mind that hotel staff have ALREADY seen EVERYTHING in their working lives. So live your life to the full and don’t worry about what others may, or may not, think. 

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I spent 35 days in Medellin and Bogota March and April.  I mostly had a longterm companion.  I was never asked for ID.  some hotels/airbnbs I registered him.  some I did not.  I also had about 15 other men.  no problems anywhere I was, but I did not ask them to check their id.  in retrospect maybe not so safe.  But most of my guests were during the day.....

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13 hours ago, 12is12 said:

Since ID were checked, why "not so safe"?

I was thinking the security aspect.  I had not read about gay torture/murders before I went.  All the men I had were obviously over 18.  The hotels/airbnbs did not check, and I did not ask them to.

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Quick update on this topic as the issue of how Colombia manages security and "guests" comes up a lot.  I have been doing some investigation of the Medellin rental market and am seeing a LOT of listings (Vrbo, Booking.com) state their guest policy up front. It is usually the registration of the cédula and some state that they charge a small fee (30K COP is less than $10USD). So discovering where you can bring a guest is becoming easier in Medellín.

For local Colombians, providing their cédula information is completely normal and very, very few will take exception to being registered with an establishment as a guest. I would suggest any Colombian that does have an issue with this process is probably more trouble than it is worth.

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3 hours ago, macdaddi said:

For local Colombians, providing their cédula information is completely normal and very, very few will take exception to being registered with an establishment as a guest. I would suggest any Colombian that does have an issue with this process is probably more trouble than it is worth.

I would extend this statement to the entire south of Rio Grande. All our countries have a National ID and we all are used to carrying it with us always, as the police has the right to demand your documentation and in most countries can detain you if you fail to produce it. 

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In Cuba , they are super strict about registering whoever stays with you overnight...some even with an afternoon "visitor", depedning on the owner and the noisy/jealous neighbors.

 

The difference, the government tracks these things....if a guy is flagged as being a "guest" very often in a hotel or casa particular, they are called in for questioning or picked up for being a prostitute..... 

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1 hour ago, floridarob said:

In Cuba....The difference, the government tracks these things....if a guy is flagged as being a "guest" very often in a hotel or casa particular, they are called in for questioning or picked up for being a prostitute..... 

Agreed and thank you for pointing that difference out. My observations are strictly about Colombia, in many other spanish-speaking countries there are implications when your information is recorded.

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On 5/10/2022 at 10:10 PM, floridarob said:

I stayed in Holiday Inn express and booked a double occupancy didn't have problems, except one guy I brought robbed me after blowing Devil's breath in my face.....long story....that was awhile ago, not sure if they still allow guests, especially after that, lol

Shocking.

Did you write down that experience somewhere?

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guys - the security policies are in place for a reason.  to protect you & the other guests/residents. use those policies to your advantage. I would not stay in a place w an open door policy.

most hotels and/or airbnbs do not want the problems that come with sex-workers on their property.  even if you can somehow get them in - you will be responsible if something happens between that sex-worker and any other guest or damage to hotel property.  the hotel/AirBnB will have no trouble connecting you to the sex-worker.

when I’m in traveling in a Brazil  - I try to only invite guys to my hotel that I’ve previously met in a sauna and determined that he is a known quantity there and will not look out of place in my hotel.  therefore, minimizing the risk.  I also hired someone from OnlyFans that had a significant following and public presence… knowing he could be tracked down.  The key is getting some sense of who these people are before bring them into your accommodation.  I find the better hotels are more flexible w guest policies once they know you are not just bringing anyone in and are using discretion in your choices. Daytime is also definitely better. After dark is a no go for me. Always walk them all the way out to the street, ensuring they have left the hotel.

Risk mitigation or safer hiring practices can be used wherever you’re traveling a few simple ideas: always tell your guest they must present ID and will be registered, whether that’s true or not. It weeds out anyone with bad intentions. Meet your guest in the lobby in full view of staff and cameras so the guest is seen & recorded. Be prepared to pay a cancel fee on the spot if anything appears off - go with your gut. Give your guest a hard-end time and say that you are going out with friends who are staying in hotel - that way they think you’re not traveling alone and friends are close by…..you can always say friends cancelled if you want to go longer. I personally don’t like the “free” guys from Scruff or Grindr because no way to vet them unless they can be cross referenced to a significant social media presence….very risky IMO.

inviting random online or street people to your room with no way to vet them, is a recipe for disaster.  You are most vulnerable in your accommodation with all your documents, cash, credit cards & electronics….and alone with an unknown person.  If you’ve been drinking, then think hard about bringing someone back at all.  Personal safety should be #1 and all other decisions follow.

If you are a foreigner, traveling anywhere in Mexico, Central/South America - you are considered a gringo and you are a target.  Always best to keep a low profile, dress like the locals and refrain from English in questionable environments.  Any loud conversation or anything that draws attention to you, just identifies you to the bad guys. And, they are watching.

It sucks to have to think about these things when on vacation. Better safe than sorry. And if you don’t think you stick out as a foreigner - you are wrong. 

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9 hours ago, floridarob said:

I've recounted my story about devil's breath several times though

you did.  and it happened to me too in a bar where the bar staff was in on it.  everyone thinks this is an urban myth….until it happens.  I reported my experience to local police and found out it was organized and happens all the time.  they were able to identify the person who did it to me.  victims didn’t report it or talk about it bc embarrassed. 

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10 hours ago, Slvkguy said:

you did.  and it happened to me too in a bar where the bar staff was in on it.  everyone thinks this is an urban myth….until it happens.  I reported my experience to local police and found out it was organized and happens all the time.  they were able to identify the person who did it to me.  victims didn’t report it or talk about it bc embarrassed. 

I suggest a theory with no scientific pretension. Just teasing you and @floridarob.

Devil's breath may not be an urban myth. It may be real, although the possibilities of being a DB victim may be near zero. However, when you are a runaway international slut, your life experience surely involve samples of even de less probable incidents. 

giphy.gif

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1 hour ago, Latbear4blk said:

Devil's breath may not be an urban myth. It may be real, although the possibilities of being a DB victim may be near zero. However, when you are a runaway international slut, your life experience surely involve samples of even de less probable incidents.

this statement is true & I appreciate the humor….I can laugh about it now.  I’ve definitely been an international slut and proud of it.  But, after that incident, I realized how vulnerable I was traveling solo & perhaps a little too friendly with unknown people. And, this person had such a perfect presentation, you would have never suspected a thing.

And, just telling you that after my experience with the police in Spain…it was a well known operation & they knew the people doing it…they had mugshots & I identified the person. They couldn’t prosecute bc they targeted tourists who were never around to show up in court. It happens far more often to straight people (both men & women).  I agree, it’s unlikely to happen to the average person - but if you’re traveling the way we do & interacting w the people we do, then be aware of the Devils Breath scam.  If two people in this forum are talking about it, it’s a thing and the probabilities are greater than you think.

btw - once they’ve dosed you w Devils Breath, you are compliant & will do as the robber suggests. Typically to an ATM to empty your account. If they overdose you, then likely you’ll pass out for an extended period of time and they will just rob you. The idea is to keep the victim semi-conscious so they can do more damage.  It’s just a warning and it actually happened to 2 people here who make real trips. Make your own conclusions & proceed accordingly 

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