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12is12

Fun in Myanmar?

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Hi All,

I'll be visiting Myanmar in February. I know it isn't famous for gay sex fun. Nevertheless, I'd appreciate any tips and suggestions regarding venues, cruising or websites, for free/social or paid/commercial activities. I'll be in Yangon, Mandalay, Inle and Bagan.

Thanks,

Roni.

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Guest tomcal

I have a friend that spent two weeks there about 2 months ago and basically the only thing gay you are going to find is yourself! :-(

They traveled in a lot of the rural areas and He enjoyed it and said that he and his BF were often the first or one of the very few caucasians that locals had seen. He said it was a beautiful country.

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On 1/11/2021 at 3:38 PM, Novarunner said:

How hard is it for Americans to travel to Myanmar during normal times (not pandemic)?

It is no problem in "normal" times.  I've been several times and nothing specially difficult in traveling there.  Food is not nearly as good as Thailand and Cambodia.

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On 1/12/2021 at 6:04 PM, kjun12 said:

It is no problem in "normal" times.  I've been several times and nothing specially difficult in traveling there.  Food is not nearly as good as Thailand and Cambodia.

I’ve been to Thailand many times and think I would like to try Myanmar.  How do you meet guys there?  Apps mainly?

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On 1/3/2014 at 3:19 AM, 12is12 said:

Hi All,

I'll be visiting Myanmar in February. I know it isn't famous for gay sex fun. Nevertheless, I'd appreciate any tips and suggestions regarding venues, cruising or websites, for free/social or paid/commercial activities. I'll be in Yangon, Mandalay, Inle and Bagan.

Thanks,

Roni.

I'm browsing these forums thinking about places I'll go to now that we're sort of returning to normal travel again. I went to Myanmar many years ago. Back in Bangkok, which was my base, a Thai friend told me he had sex with guys in central Yangon, near Shwedegon Pagoda - they'd meet in a park and you could just stick your hand up their longi. I didn't do anything while I was there, but his story made me want to go back. Wondering if you went and if you had any luck.

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Certainly not the time to go to Myanmar now. While the world is outraged by the appalling attack by Russia on Ukraine and the news is full of the war crimes committed there every day, the massacre of civilians in Myanmar by the "army" is largely ignored. After all that Aung San su Kyi has been through is her life, defending her people and their freedom, her imprisonment on fake charges is a disgrace that the world doesn't seem to care about. 

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20 hours ago, Ruthrieston said:

Certainly not the time to go to Myanmar now. While the world is outraged by the appalling attack by Russia on Ukraine and the news is full of the war crimes committed there every day, the massacre of civilians in Myanmar by the "army" is largely ignored. After all that Aung San su Kyi has been through is her life, defending her people and their freedom, her imprisonment on fake charges is a disgrace that the world doesn't seem to care about. 

Good points. It's not a place I'm likely to return to, I was just wondering if 12is12 ever made it and what his experience was. When I went, I was hesitant because of the human rights situation back then - it was not nearly as bad as it is now, but it was still not good. I don't regret going, because it was a beautiful country - nothing like any place I'd ever been, but I definitely would not go now. It's very sad for those who have to endure those conditions. I wish there was something we could do to help.

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I had no sex there.

On a more imprtnt issue: I have no sympathy for San Suu Kyi! She and the majority of her democratic followers supported and defended the Rohinga genicide. She and them deserve what's happening now.

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1 hour ago, 12is12 said:

I had no sex there.

On a more imprtnt issue: I have no sympathy for San Suu Kyi! She and the majority of her democratic followers supported and defended the Rohinga genicide. She and them deserve what's happening now.

 

I don't feel qualified to judge her since I don't know how much of that was an attempt to avoid what has happened since. I think it unlikely that there was no sense in the higher political circles that the army was moving back to try to take over and confrontation would only speed that day.

I feel very bad for the people. The army's atrocities are every bit as bad as the Russians from what I can read. They're just covered a lot less (though to be fair the lack of communications infrastructure in the country makes it harder for reports to get out.)

 

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Like @caeron I do not know enough about the intricacies of Burmese politics, although I do have sympathy for Aung San Suu Kyi. I realise she stood by and said nothing when the army launched its purge against the Rohingya people and that is an absolute disgrace. But she had all but rescued the country from army control almost as her father had achieved independence for the country from the British prior to his assassination only six months later. She elected to stay in the country for decades hardly seeing her husband and children to be a beacon around whom the anti-militarists could unite. She too was the subject of an assassination attempt in 2003 when at least 70 of her followers were killed.

But her silence over the Rohingya massacres mystified most of the world who then changed their views about her. But I wonder what would have happened had she spoken out against the army. Would it have resulted in changing anything? It seems to me with my limited understanding that it would not. The Rohingya problem goes way back in history and is surely one of the disastrous legacies of British colonialism. This was further exacerbated when the Rohingya muslims allied with the British during World War 2 whereas the Rakhine State Buddhists were allied with the Japanese. After independence, the Rohingya were treated almost as black South Africans were treated in that country under apartheid. It seems someone made promises to the Rohingya either that they would have a separate state or could secede and become part of what was first East Pakistan and now Bangladesh. 

What eventually unfolded was a humanitarian disaster. The army was clearly responsible. Pinning the blame on Aung San Suu Kyi as many seem to do is at the least unfortunate.

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